Naturalist Fact: Reddish Egret

Photo from Animalspot.net.

Photo from Animalspot.net.


©William Newton

©William Newton


Reddish egrets are large wading birds that can be found on Little St. Simons beaches during the Summer. When identifying a reddish egret, make sure to account for the two different color morphs: one has a slate blue-ish gray body with a rufous ruff around the neck and head, while the other is pure white. Both are pictured above, and you might notice that in both cases, the bill turns from pink to black—a characteristic that sets them apart from other white herons. To that end, here’s a fun fact: all egrets are herons, but not all herons are egrets. The word “egret” refers only to the white herons; it’s derived from the French word “aigrette”, which translates to “silver heron” and “brush”, in reference to their beautiful wispy breeding plumes. Those same lovely feathers were prized for women’s hats at the turn of the 20th Century, leading to their extirpation from the United States. Luckily, with the enactment of the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, reddish egrets received Federal protection. Today, their numbers are increasing, yet they still haven’t fully recovered; this time, habitat loss is to blame. As coastal specialists, reddish egrets need protected lands such as Little St. Simons.

To find a reddish egret on Little St. Simons, check Sancho Panza during the early morning and late evening hours. If you do spot a reddish egret, be sure to stop and watch! Reddish egrets are extremely active hunters, and their unique style sets them apart from their heron cousins. When in pursuit of a fish, reddish egrets will flap their wings to reduce glare on the water and give chase, rendering what looks exactly like a “dance”!

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Naturalist Fact: Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-crowned Night Herons can be found year-round at Little St. Simons Island. These mid-sized wading birds received their name because they are most active during the evening hours, but they can be seen during the day as well. Black-crowned Night Herons are most easily recognized by their piercing red eyes, yellow legs, and black crown. To distinguish them from a Yellow-crowned Night Heron, note that Yellow-crowned Night Herons have a white or yellow crown, not black.

It is suspected that Black-crowned Night Herons forage at night because they are outcompeted in the daytime hours by larger wading birds. While they eat mostly fish, they have developed another interesting hunting strategy: they have been known to nest in the same sites as other herons and egrets, using their protection during the day, and preying upon the other nests at night. This picture was taken early one morning in the rookery at Norm’s Pond—it seems as though this Black-crowned Night Heron is demonstrating this fascinating behavior!

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